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20121027
20121104
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KQED (PBS) 36
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English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> colby? >> national tracking polls has of them close, but the key battleground states, obama still holds a lead. >> what is the ground game, mark? >> the organized effort over months to identify and not only support -- identified not only supporters, but leaners, and persuade them on how one by one retail basis. weeks before election day, you know who your voters are. you want to be sure you get the vote. >> in many of the battle ground states, obama has more field offices. >> it is down to micromanaging, micro-issuing these of votes. interestingly, the republicans had a better ground game in 2004, and a lot of people think that is why and they won that close election. it sort of fell into disrepair today are building it back up now, but i don't think they are anywhere near where obama is yet. >> there is another question. which candidate has the most d.c. asked to come most engaged, most dedicated supporters? >> that is a hard one to answer. clearly after the first debate, the republican party at everly and these as to support their. romney did do well compared to obama. there was disap
is probably going to win in the end. that's because of barack obama. states like nevada be a good example gwen: you say nevada? >> you're right. i'm going to get angry letters now. but i think it's a state where the votes are going to track very similar to the lines of the presidential race. gwen: how about montana? >> you're not seeing the opposite. there isn't a lot of romney coattail effect out of these states. a lot are really either competitive or leaning toward obama. it would not shock me if the race is decided by less than 1,000 votes. that's how tight it is. >> or how many people! [laughter] >> and indiana this week, gloria? that wasn't such a tight race and all of a sudden it is again the >> well, of course. because of remarks made my mourdock, who spoke about rape again and it sort of echoed todd achein, -- aikin, even though it was very different because he is opposed to any exceptions for a abortion. that is a difference from mitt romney's position, we should say. but what happens, when you have this be an issue in the campaign, and you talk about women being up for grarkss women
governor romney and a lot of red states, there is a possibility of one candidate, probably rendezvous' anymore popular votes and greeted romney winning popular votes and obama winning electoral votes. democrats are going to immediately say we have been here before. al gore got more votes in 2000, and president bush became president. there will be a cry, but that is the nature of what we have. tavis: the only response would be that the rule is simple. he to get 270 wins. that would be the order of the day, but for all the talk about the closeness of the reyes said you and i just engaged in and every other american seems to be engaged in, -- closed as of the race you and i have been engaged in and every other american seems to be engaged in, i have not seen one poll that shows mr. romney is anywhere near 270. >> therein lies the challenge for governor romney. these polls show him doing well. there are more paths for president obama. governor romney has got a lock in florida. that has not happened 100%. i think governor romney has more to look for the reagan romney again has to win virgi
is whether democratic strongholds like youngstown will give mr. obama enough margin to carry the state and stay in the white house. mr. obama's popularity here is maintained by strong support from autoworkers like union president green. >> in march everything almost came to a halt, right. the contractors we had in the plant were backing off. there were helicopters flying over our plant taking inventory, people walking through our plant with clipboards taking inventory. they were going to liquidate our facility. that's a fact. so mitt romney can air brush this all i wants. that's what was happening at the time. the fact that president obama stood up and said i'm going take a bet on the american workers and we're going to invest in this when it wasn't a popular thing to do, absolutely he deserves credit. >> mr. obama needs to persuade more than just his union base that he's the one to continue this success. while the energy boom happened under his watch ohio voters are not all quick to give him the credit. crist of emmitt's oil & gas voted for mr. obama in 2008 and says the president has
the presidency without winning. ohio will be the decisive state. if president obama wins florida, it moves the -- >> i could see florida being -- >> what i heard democrats talk about if they can hold ohio, hold wisconsin, paul ryan's home state, hold nevada, they could lose all other swing states, lose the congressional district in maine and come out with exactly 270 electoral votes. gwen: you add it up that way, john? >> that sounds very powerful. what i am struck by is there hasn't been any mystery about this. if you go further than a year ago, president obama's team was very straightforward. they expected it was going to be mitt romney. they were going to make him very unacceptable. the wealthy and out of touch background. they did that. they had a micro targeted micromessage strategy. they said what they were going to do. and stuck to that strategy seems to be with remarkable discipline. if it works, they look really, really smart. the difference between being really smart and really dumb -- [laughter] >> what's remarkable is that they broadcast that, right? >> and the romney campaign
. >> narrator: barack obama began his life on an island. >> our sun-filled, fun-filled, 50th state. >> narrator: his birth certificate reveals his history: born in hawaii, the son of an african man and a white 18-year- old from kansas. >> stanley ann dunham was really a thoroughly unconventional mother in almost every way. she fell in love with and conceived a child with an african man at a time when nearly two dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't ow his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> nar
about it. >> reporter: in fact, barack obama won this state handily in 2008 he was well ahead here this year until the first debate, when mitt romney gained ground. >> when mitt romney led bain, hundreds of plants, factories, and stores were shuttered. workers saw their wages slashed, their jobs sent overseas. >> look at the evidence of the last four years. under the president's policies, middle income americans have been buried. hay ear just being crushed. >> reporter: for local citizens that's meant a flood of ads, stuffed mailboxes, thousands of phone calls and knocks on their doors. by one recent count, this area is the most saturated political market in the nation. the national campaign for the presidency has come down to a battle for a relatively small number of swing counties and brown county here is one of them for the competing parties, everything now depends on organization, the so-called ground game. ben sparks is communication director for the romney campaign in wisconsin. >> the key to winning races in wisconsin is enthusiasm and voter intensity. in 2010, when republic
. the question is where do things stand exactly in the battle ground states? the obama campaign has been insistent that they continue to have leads in enough battle ground states to win the election. the romney campaign insists that they are in a position to be able to overtake the president in a number of these states. so, we're playing in part a game of spin. somebody is going to be proven right or wrong. we know that some of these states have tightened up from where they were a month ago. i think that as susan said part of the issue is who is going to be able to get their voters out at this point, under what could be some difficult circumstances? >> woodruff: susan, how are you reading these polls right now? >> i'm struck over and over again by the damage that president obama did to his campaign in that first debate. it's like your mother always told you, you never get a second chance to make a first impression. in this pew poll that is just out, more than a third of voters said their impression of governor romney was improved in that first debate. we know from the usa today gallup po
. >> rose: so you said 75 percent likely obama will be elected? >> that's right beuse the states are what we call the tipping point states that would swing the electorial college margin he has a two or three-point lead, so it is not for sure but we can use statistics and data that just look up how often those lead translate into a win. > > rose: zero so is critical point here is that many people say paul, david brooks wrote a column. >> sure. >> a you know basically saying a poll is a paragraph of a moment in time. >> right. >> rose: period. >> uh-huh. >> rose: no prophecy from that. >> my understanding, what you say is, yes, no prophecy, but you can look and reference it to other times and with similar circumstances existed and then project forward. >> that's right, so and the way we look at it is the confidence should increase the closer you get to election day so if you look at polls in june, and june of 1988 michael dukakis was way ahead of bush, john kerry was ahead of gore, so polls in the spring and summer aren't very useful and you might look at what kind of economic conditions are l
other states. >> i think we ought to keep on the track that we're on. >> i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >> woodruff: but the romney campaign also began airing a spanish-language ad in florida tying obama to latin american dictators hugo chavez and fidel castro. >> we are america's women. >> woodruff: and american future fund, a super pac supporting romney is running ads targeting women in michigan and pennsylvania, states considered safely democratic. as you can see on the "newshour's" vote 2012 map center" there are seven states currently considered by the associated press to be true toss ups: nevada, colorado, iowa, ohio, virginia, florida and new hampshire. it shows each candidate's quickest potential path to 270 electoral votes. including one scenario giving president obama a path to victory, winning nevada and ohio, to get to 277 electoral votes. for mitt romney the path could also lead through ohio, and blanketing the south, to get to 281 in a different scenario. and there are also several potentials for a tie. this one shows the president losing nevada but winning o
is in a dead heat. polls give obama a slight edge. some of the other states are close. nobody knows what will happen. what we do know is that romney had a little bit of momentum. he was closing gaps, then everything stopped and the election was put on hold. president obama, you can feel the momentum on his side right now. we will have to see how the election plays out. sandy, beyond being a natural disaster, will always be part of the american electoral history. >> sandy has blunted some of the more bitter partisanship. now. we have six days left until the elections. will we hear a different town when the present its back on the campaign trail? >> slightly different. the president will want to stay optimistic, not suddenly descend into taken some cheap shots or one liners. he is now playing commander in chief of an ongoing crisis. remember, this is not about a day when a storm hits. this will go on for weeks and months. i think you will have an optimistic tone for the president. mitt romney will be going after obama more through his sarah gets. he will have to discuss why there are bette
, president obama said officials are ready. >> there's been extraordinarily close coordination between state, federal, and local governments. and so we're confident that the assets are prepositioned for an effective response in the aftermath of the storm. r david paulison knows about mobilizing the federal government's response to a hurricane. he was in two weeks after hurricane katrina. are you confident that fema is prepared given the sheer size of this storm, almost a thousand miles in dimer. >> it is a huge storm and the impact will on the storm is so big, it is impacting several states from dc all the way up to maine at the same time. but i am rae very comfortable. we have a great administrator running the organization. he gets it, he's from florida, a good emergency manager. doesn't run around with his hair on fire. so i'm confident they will do a good job. >> on a conference call today n fact, your successor, mr. fugate said the disaster fund at fema has a billion dollars in t more or less. is that enough for this kind of response that will be necessary? >> probably at the end of expe
will close for the entire session tomorrow. seven states and the district of columbia have already been declared in states of emergency, opening the way for the federal coordination of money and resources for disaster relief efforts. at the white house today, president obama said officials are ready. >> there's been extraordinarily close coordination between state, federal, and local governments. and so we're confident that the assets are prepositioned for an effective response in the aftermath of the storm. r david paulison knows about mobilizing the federal government's response to a hurricane. he was in two weeks after hurricane katrina. are you confident that fema is prepared given the sheer size of this storm, almost a thousand miles in dimer. >> it is a huge storm and the impact will on the storm is so big, it is impacting several states from dc all the way up to maine at the same time. but i am rae very comfortable. we have a great administrator running the organization. he gets it, he's from florida, a good emergency manager. doesn't run around with his hair on fire. so i'm conf
will vote for president obama this time around, why are they waiting for having success of the state and local level? >> hispanics are not monolithic, and when you look at florida, you have a cuban-american community that has historically been very republican. i think people are interested and want to report hispanic candidates, they are good. if marco rubio had had a pro in negation reform position, he would be the candidate, but since he does not, he was not chosen. eventually, i think the more sober voices will have more weight. tavis: what you think is the future of marco rubio? he did not win the hispanic vote. what is your read on his future? >> he is an intelligent man. he is quite articulate. does he play in florida? i am not sure. does he play in taxes, i am not sure. marco rubio is seen in some ways of being the latino face of a party that is very harsh to latinos. >> the democratic mayor acquitted himself quite nicely. what is his future? >> he is probably the biggest star they have the right now. he is a very smart guy. he is highly educated and very different from a lot
this a year ago, that it would be close, and they've got the election they anticipated. a handful of states will decide if the candid -- will decide it. candidates will be in and out of the state's multiple times. >> what can they actually do at this stage? barack obama, mitt romney, to try to persuade people after two years of campaigning and, whenever it is, a couple of billion dollars in advertising have not made their minds of yet. >> as you say, there are very few persuade of all voters, but there may be some who will listen to a final argument -- there are very few persuadable voters. the second thing is they each need to have the most energized base possible, and so many of these rallies will be in strong republican or strong democratic areas with the intention of doing everything they can to get everybody out to vote on tuesday. >> before the hurricane hit, we were seeing momentum towards mitt romney. are you seeing anything in polls from talking to these people that suggests that might have changed? >> i do not think it has changed dramatically. there was some sense that what momen
marching on. >> what you are talking about, odette, in two swing states, nevada and colorado, is going to be the key. i've been to those states. early, get out the vote, among the latino grass roots activists there, it's huge. and that could give president obama the margin there. >> belva: women, gender. >> women, you know, we had this week sandra fluke here in the bay area. reproductive rights activists. look, women have been for obama, he's enjoyed this gender gap for a long time. and in the last couple of weeks, romney has managed to shave that down, very concerning to the reproductive rights groups and they've really been working this vote all over the country and the fact is that they tracked what they say is about 5 million women who they call obama defectors who may go to the other side, go to mitt romney and that could be a key margin in some of these swing states. >> he's got ads out there that suggest he's not going to be activist on that issue. you're right about the issue of obama care for a lot of women. birth control is an economic issue. and that's one of the things demo
for contributions not to the obama campaign but to the red cross from that massive email list that barack obama has. the campaigns were up and running. they're still doing all the things they normally do. there's a little more sensitivity in the states that are affected by the hurricane but they can't really afford to pull out, to push the pause button. >> ifill: democrats have been saying that mitt romney during the republican primary debates may have said that he would actually cut back on fema which is not as unpopular as it once was. >> he said he wanted to move as much of that responsibility to the states and to private contributions as possible. so he's getting hit for that right now. what would mitt romney's fema look like? would it be as well funded as the current organization? there's about $7 billion in the bank right now. if mitt romney and republicans were in control in congress there is a question as to how they would handle disaster relief. generally speaking they've not wanted to spend as much money on that. certainly when they do spend money on disaster relief they want to offset it
states, and that is i will act to repeal obamacare. >> mr. obama's experience on capitol hill should be a warning. the odds are -- >> i don't know what his definition of a good democrat is, other than someone who will abandon the core principles of the democratic party. >> and if that president is relegated to the heap of one-term losers, democrats will be in no mood to play nice on anything mr. romney wants to do. abroad, as at home, the most powerful man in the world is perhaps less powerful than he seems. whoever wins next tuesday must operate within a limited bandwidth. that's not to say there aren't real differences. but as mr. obama has found, offering whole scale change is a promise that's hard to live up to. >> well, for more on the job awaiting whoever wins the keys to the white house on tuesday, i spoke with don mcmanus, the washington columnist for "the los angeles times." that report is not easy to offer full-scale change in the system that america has. but it is right, isn't it, that the vision that mitt romney have and the vision that barack obama have is quite differen
, minorities have really changed the way this election works. this is the argument the obama campaign has given for states like nevada, colorado, florida, even northern virginia. that the demographic changes have been so big that we have missed that. and that they have been able to tap into those new voters they have registered, the latinos. the big number these have registered in nevada, that they have been able to register them and get them to the polls in a way that is much more effective than we know. >> rose: john dickerson, thank you. >> thanks so much. when we come back the impact of the digital revolution on books and publishing. stay with us. john steinbeck once said the profession of book writing makes horse racing seem like a soiled, stable business. those words have never sounded truer than they do today. traditional publishings is in the threat from all angles am book stores are closing around the country. is there is a growing fear print technology is dying out all together. as always with great change comes great opportunity. digital technology has the capacity to bring new forms
on this race, i'm joined by the bbc north america editor in florida where president obama was supposed to be campaigning today and bridgette in cleveland, ohio, the state where governor romney was supposed to be stomping today. let's start with you in florida. i'm incredibly jealous. pouring with rain here in washington, d.c. it must feel a world away, both weather-wise and politically. >> yes, it does. we woke up here this morning thinking the president wag going to launch his campaign. we knew this was going to be a big moment with bill clinton rolling out the big guns, if you like, and that was all canceled rather suddenly just as we woke up. so it was really strange knowing he was flying back to cope with a crisis while the rally went on and the normal things you hear at these rallies, the political campaign was going on. and the storm was mentioned by bill clinton but really not heavily. only in passing. and i think people are obviously talking about it to a certain extent. it's not in the front of their minds. what it does politically, conventional campaigning has ceased. it take
, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more people began looking for work again. in west allis, wisconsin, the president's republican challenger, mitt romney, focused on that number, insisting again, "we can do better." >> he said he was going to
that president obama quickly declared major disasters in new york and new jersey overnight. the decision frees up federal dollars to help families and businesses recover their losses. it also allows the u.s. to reimburse local and state governments for some of the expenses they'll face as they rebuild. the east coast may be cleaning up, but sandy isn't finished. the storm is plowing inland, dumping snow across the appalachians. with sandy still churning, it's nearly impossible to know how extensive the damage will be or how long the cleanup will last. sylvia hall, nbr, washington. >> tom: earlier, susie mentioned the challenges of getting around one of the world's largest and most congested cities with no public transportation. city buses began rolling on new york streets at 5:00 p.m. eastern time today, but only partial service and on a reduced schedule. we have more on the work ahead to get new york moving again with erika miller. >> reporter: in new york city, the subway is a lifeline. the transportation network is the center of culture and commerce. more than four million people a day go thro
think there has been some significant steps that we need to praise the decisions met by the obama administration to guarantee. >> rose: like the dream act. >> absolutely. those are elements of a greater recognition of the need to take stock of the reality of what immigration has done for the united states. >> rose: i've talked about president calderon about climate change and his own strong environmental efforts to do something. there is also this. some people are predicting that not mexico but brazil has the greatest growing economy in latin america in this decade. is that something you believe, are there numbers to indicate that. certainly when you think of the discovery of oil offshore and to fuel that kind of explosion. >> let alone that charlie we also have significant reserves of shale gas. we also have right now the second largest growing economy in all of the oecd countries. we have very low levels of inflation. we have very low levels of unemployment. we have just created this year 780,000 new jobs. >> rose: but is tourism down because of all of the stories of violence
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)